Wednesday, 23 December 2015


Where do I start?

At some point in the last few months, I have struggled to maintain my drive/motivation. There are many reasons behind this and I cannot go into great detail about much, but I'm slowly figuring out more through self-reflection. All teachers probably go through these times and it is important to try and re-establish some focus/goals. I absolutely love teaching, I love my students and seeing them develop and grow over their time with me. I love interacting with my PLN (even though I have been quite absent in recent times) as they inspire, challenge and help me grow. I love my family and the support I get from them. I'm eternally grateful for opportunities that have come along over the past 2 years.

I think my frustration and disappointment is stemming from seeing what great leadership could look like, how innovative practices can transform learning, how forward-thinking schools are led by leaders that lead and not just managed, seeing inspirational teachers and dedicated professionals inspire thanks to my PLN. Maybe this is just wishful thinking or an unattainable dream, but I hope it is not.

I want to be able to work where:
  • teachers opinions and contributions are valued, 
  • they have input in decisions that affect themselves and their students, 
  • they are part of the solution and help generate it through informed discussions, 
  • remunerated and treated fairly, 
  • respected and allowed to pursue new ideas to benefit their students.
Many of these points reflect what students are also looking for, and I'm trying my very best to give it to them, even when the systems restrict/hinder me from doing it.

Students want to be at a school where:
  • students opinions and contributions are valued
  • students have a say in the decisions that affect their learning
  • Students help solve problems/issues, rather than being the problem
  • they are respected
  • they are allowed to pursue their passions
Maybe I'm just rambling, but as I try and figure out where I head to next I need to put it down in words. I think the three parts that have kept me going, and kept me somewhat focused are: my wife and daughter, my students and some key members of my PLN. They are my sources of inspiration, the people that challenge me and help me become a better teacher.

I'm looking forward to the challenges and adventures that await in 2016 and beyond...

Monday, 7 September 2015

Literature critique for Masters

Here is what I have been working on over the past 10 days. My latest assessment piece as part of Master of Education - Knowledge Networks and Digital Innovation degree.

Wednesday, 2 September 2015

What am I up to?

This blog has been exceptionally quiet the past few months. 
I have been very busy with my senior students as they near the end of their school careers, presenting at events, running TeachMeets, a GEG Study group and my next unit with Masters program (Education - Knoweldge Networks & Digital innovation). I hope to get back into this blog site and update it with some of my reflections from the events from the past few months when Semester 2 finishes in mid-October. Until then, you can follow along on my Masters Blog site: or connect with me on Twitter @jdtriver

Friday, 29 May 2015

My Every Classroom Matters episode with CoolCatTeacher

One of my all time highlights of teaching happened a little while ago. At the end of last year I had a very successful activity that I blogged about - The #TweetingAztecs Project. This caught the attention of Vicki Davis (@coolcatteacher), one the educators I most admire and have followed online since joining Twitter in 2012. She wanted to interview me for her BAM Radio Podcast - Every Classroom Matters. I could not believe it, and was so excited for the opportunity. Interview was done in January and published online this month (on my birthday, coincidence?). It was such a privilige and fantastic experience. Have a listen and let me know what you think.

So, here it is:

This whole project and interview would not have been possible without the power of my PLN, TeachMeets, Simon McKenzie, my students, Vicki Davis, Lisa Durff and BAM Radio. Thank you all for helping me grow as a teacher and allowing me to share my passion.

Looking forward to more Australian educators feauturing on her show. 

Wednesday, 27 May 2015

Scholarly Book Review of Digital Leadership – Changing Paradigms for Changing Times by Eric Sheninger

Concepts and Practices in a Digital Age, Charles Sturt University, Scholarly Book Review Assessment, originally published on my CSU Thinkspace Blog

Review of Digital Leadership - Changing Paradigms for Changing Times by Eric Sheninger

Integration of digital technology into education has come to the forefront this century and it has become clear that educators of all levels need to adapt to serve learners in this new digital age. Change is required and Eric Sheninger explores in Digital Leadership - Changing Paradigms for Changing Times how educators can successfully and practically use technology to transform school cultures and create sustainable change. In Digital Leadership he shares personal experience, insights and examples of how educators have harnessed the power of technology to transform schools, and he establishes a framework to guide educators in becoming digital leaders. This review will focus on Digital Leadership’s role in providing a compelling argument and methods to initiate sustainable change, simultaneously acknowledging trends in information and knowledge environments that are created by social and technological changes in the digital age.

Eric Sheninger is a Senior Fellow and Thought Leader on Digital Leadership with the International Center for Leadership in Education. At time of publication of this book he was Principal of New Milford High School, New Jersey, where he had extensive experience in developing and implementing innovative practices with tremendous success. The practical examples lends to the authenticity and strength of the book. The book is aimed at school leaders, however the framework can be applied to classroom teachers too. It is broken up into two distinctive parts; the first part focuses on why a change is required, whilst in the second part he shares his ‘Seven Pillars of Digital Leadership’ in separate chapters. They are: communication, public relations, branding, professional growth and development, increasing student engagement and enhancing learning, rethinking learning environments and spaces, and discovering opportunity. These pillars are aligned to the 2009 International Society of Technology in Education’s (ISTE) National Educational Standard for Administrators and provide the framework for technological changes in the digital age.

Sheninger believes that school leaders need to acknowledge that modern learners are ‘wired’ differently, and their learning styles are in conflict with traditional teaching methods (2014, p. 15). There has been a societal shift in technology use, with social media, mobile devices and online communication driving a new knowledge ecosystem (O’Connell, 2015). This is supported by research from the PEW Research Center's Internet & American Life Project that finds, 92% of teens report going online daily — including 24% who say they go online almost constantly” and that the internet is a central and indispensable part in the lives of American teens and young adults (Lenhart, 2015). He utilises research from Childwise, Bloomberg, Strategy Analytics, mobiThinking, MacArthur Foundation, and others to explain the changing dynamics in accessing technology. 

A new culture of learning is developing, where information is networked and where participation is reshaping the way individuals learn (Thomas & Brown, 2011). Technology is driving this change, and this is why Sheninger believes it is so important to create learning experiences that are flexible, adaptable and that creates new skills in students for the twenty-first century. The Digital Media and Learning Hub supports this with their model of connected learning; which contends that connected learning involves an equal, social and participatory culture (, 2015). Sheninger explains that understanding how learners in the twenty-first century use technology is key to developing a school culture that will best meet the needs of students. Patricia Collarbone (2009), in Creating Tomorrow, supports the view that managing and leading the modernisation is required through an effective process for substantial, beneficial and sustainable change. Sheninger’s message here is about laying a foundation for students to become critical consumers of content, develop digital citizenship, and promote the ability to create, analyse and interpret media (2014, p. 35). Professor Yong Zhao (2012) also acknowledges in his book, World Class Learners, similar skills for students, the skills are effective communication, curiosity, and critical thinking.

Eric Sheninger reviews how the education landscape has changed, and the importance of school leaders taking charge in leading change management; highlighted with these quotes, “leaders must be the pillars of their respective institutions and focus on solutions rather than problems” (2014, p. 31) and “it is our duty to be agents of change” (2014, p. 36). Using examples from Seth Godin, Daniel Pink, Ian Jukes, Pam Moran, and Michael Fullard he highlights some of the reasons for change and why embracing digital leadership is key. Leaders need to join online conversations and take responsibility for the actions and education of future leaders, the students (Ahlquist, 2014). Sheninger blends into Chapter 4 the work of Michael Fullan (2008), a change expert, and discusses Fullan’s ‘Six Secrets of Change’ and how they are applied to Digital Leadership principles. Alongside this he deals effortlessly with obstacles that many schools face, and ways that they could be overcome with various strategies. Obstacles such as Wi-Fi, networks, budget cuts, government regulations and others are great concerns for many, and is an area that could be explored further. Each school situation is different, and Sheninger (2014) does make a point that “Each school is an autonomous body with distinct dynamics that make it unique. It's the small changes over time that will eventually leave a lasting impact.” (p. 70). The constant message is that it is a shift in mindset that is required for schools. Scott Klososky points out that education leaders today are becoming transitional leaders, “who are responsible for managing the transition to teaching and learning in a different way, preparing very different students to go into a very different world” (O'Brien, 2015).  As part of the transformation process, Sheninger highlights the importance of students having their voices heard in transforming school cultures, and this is an area of strength for the book.

In leading into the Seven Pillars, he shares some of the key areas of change at his school, New Milford, and his own personal journey. Points raised centre on how connectedness acted as a catalyst for change, importance of sharing a vision, supporting and empowering staff, establishing the value in changes and allowing students to be part of the process.. The driving question according to Sheninger is how we should use the technology that is available to us to improve what we do, instead of why we should use it to improve what we do (Sheninger, 2014). Chapters 5-11 explore this through explanations, how to accomplish it and showcases examples of educators that have paved the way. Social Media tools play an important role in almost every single pillar, along with the idea of ‘Connectedness’ being the conduit for supporting each of the pillars.

Communication, Public Relations and Branding are the first three pillars and they can be considered to be interdependent upon one another. Sheninger (2014, p. 86) says, “Educators must be experts in effective communication techniques, especially when it comes to parents and other key stakeholders”. Communication at the same time needs to be a two-way form, not a static one-way transmission, and social media allows this to take place. He uses examples from how to use Facebook and Twitter to communicate, plus discussions of Joe Mazza’s ‘eFace’ concept where technology is used to support Family and Community Engagement initiatives. Ribble and Miller (2013) also agree that technology and social networks provide a tremendous avenue for communication and building relationships. This is also noted by Bouffard (2015) that communication is at the heart of family–school relationships.

Communication is seen in both the next two pillars, Public Relations and Branding. Using the story of Van Meter Community School District under the leadership of John Carver, he explains how they used social media tools to establish a global footprint and craft their own message. This showcases the powerful message that, “If we do not tell our story, someone else will.” (Sheninger, 2014, p. 99). Digital Leadership allows schools to create a solid foundation for positive public relations using social media that complements communication efforts (Sheninger, 2014, p. 99). Branding allows educators to leverage social media and other digital tools to establish their professional brands in education. This is done through building connections, sharing, trust, and relationships with students, parents, teachers and stakeholders. These three boil down to establishing a schools message, communicating it and building a positive identity for the school. Sheninger mentions that communication is the most important thing he does every day (2014, p.89). 

In the Pillar for Professional Growth and Development, Sheninger discusses the power of creating a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and how to do this. He uses research from Alec Couros to showcase how an online PLN is crucial for modern educators. One of the key reasons why online PLN’s are so powerful for learning is that “Knowledge is shared, and not just taken” (2014, p. 119). Connectedness is becoming the standard for teaching professionals to grow, and  “Digital leadership require connectedness as an essential component to cultivate innovative practices and lead sustainable change” (Sheninger, 2014, p. 122). The learning model of ‘Connectivism’ acknowledges the shifts in society where learning is no longer an internal, individualistic activity, but rather deriving competence from forming connections (Siemens, 2004). Educators can now learn anytime, anywhere, and with anyone through leveraging the power of social media networks.

Increasing Student Engagement and Enhancing Learning Pillar ties together how leaders can support learners in developing knowledge, skills, and confidence to be successful in the twenty-first century. The key concept that Sheninger (2014, p.134) shares is that this new learning requires a constructivist, heutagogical approach to teaching and learning. Jackie Gerstein (2013) also explains that teachers, learners, networks, connections, media, resources and tools are creating a unique entity that has the potential to meet individual needs. Students want their learning to be authentic and meaningful. Students need to be at the centre of decision-making, and the strength in this book is how Sheninger constantly refers to utilising students’ voice to support the change. Students become educated on digital citizenship, responsibility and creating positive digital footprints; something that many schools are failing at. Students have a wide-ranging set of technology skills, this is changing teaching methods, as well as when and how students learn and many schools are integrating digital citizenship training as part of their school improvement efforts (Ribble & Miller, 2013). He often refers to pedagogy first and tools second in creating sustainable change, making it clear that devices and technology always come second.

Learning environments and spaces pillar links in well with creating learning areas that are flexible, foster creativity and facilitate learning. He demonstrates this with the Gahana Jefferson District example of how they re-imagined spaces and how they could be utilised. The issue of school redesign he believes should be part of any educational reform process. Discovering opportunity rounds up the Seven Pillars, and once again he links the pillars together and summarises how they are interdependent on one another. Through working on the first six pillars it will allow leaders to find innovative solutions, share their stories and model digital leadership. This will then result in countless opportunities for schools, educators and students to open up.

Connect, collaborate, share, create and communicate are cornerstones for the 21st century educators and through Digital Leadership - Changing Paradigms for Changing Times, Sheninger provides an informative and practical guide on how to initiate the change. He addresses the paradigm shift that is taking place due to connectedness, ubiquitous nature of information and accelerated changes in technology. Through his own story, that of other innovative educators, and supported with various external sources, he showcases how they have responded to the change. He acknowledges that at the heart of digital leadership, the human interactions will always remain the key component in changing education (Sheninger, 2014, p. 191). For school leaders there is no longer a debate on whether or not to be a digital leader, Eric Sheninger successfully provides a clear framework on why and how to initiate the change.


Ahlquist, J. (2014). Trending Now: Digital Leadership Education Using Social Media and the Social Change Model. J Ldrship Studies, 8(2), 57-60. doi:10.1002/jls.21332
Bouffard, S. (2015). Tapping Into Technology: The Role of the Internet in Family–School Communication / Browse Our Publications / Publications & Resources / HFRP - Harvard Family Research Project. Retrieved 17 April 2015, from
Collarbone, P. (2009). Creating tomorrow (p. 11). London: Network Continuum.,. (2015). Connected Learning Infographic | Connected Learning. Retrieved 14 April 2015, from
Fullan, M. (2001). Leading in a culture of change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Gerstein, J. (2013). Schools are doing Education 1.0; talking about doing Education 2.0; when they should be planning Education 3.0. User Generated Education. Retrieved 16 April 2015, from
Lenhart, A. (2015). Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015. Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved 13 April 2015, from
O'Brien, A. (2015). School Leaders: Guiding Teachers into the Digital Age. Edutopia. Retrieved 15 April 2015, from
O'Connell, J. (2015). 1.3 Trends in Technology Environments. Lecture, Retrieved March 20, 2015, from Charles Sturt University website:
Ribble, M., & Miller, T. (2013). Educational Leadership in an Online World: Connecting Students to Technology Responsibly, Safely, and Ethically. Journal Of Asynchronous Learning Networks,17(1), 137-145. Retrieved from
Sheninger, E. (2014). Digital leadership. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.
Siemens, G. (2004). elearnspace. Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Retrieved 17 April 2015, from
Thomas, D., & Brown, J. (2011). A new culture of learning. [Lexington, Ky.]: [CreateSpace?].
Zhao, Y. (2012). World class learners (p. 8). Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press, a Joint Publication with the National Association of Elementary School Principals.

Sunday, 29 March 2015

Connect to live

Connect to live

I’m in my 5th year of teaching, after changing careers, studying and moving countries. Over the past 3 years I have become more engrossed and aware of the emergence of connected learning environments. From joining Twitter, reading blogs, writing blogs, listening to podcasts, and connecting with educators across Australia and the world. It constantly amazes me the wealth of knowledge and sharing that connected educators are doing online, and it encourages and inspires me every day. ‘Connected Learning’ and ‘Digital Literacy’ is quickly evolving into foundations of my own teaching strategies. In a rapidly evolving world of information technology, it is becoming paramount as a teacher that I’m able to develop these areas in my students and allow them to develop their skills.
Everything Is Connected
creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by auspices:
Technology has allowed new connections, interactions and participatory cultures to emerge. To be able to to use theses to the best effect, we foremost need to have a clear understanding and grasp of ‘Digital Literacy’ and how it relates to education. Bawden (2008) identifies a number of key facets of digital literacy; they include areas such as knowledge assembly, retrieval skills, critical thinking, using people networks and publishing information. This reflects strongly with my own teaching context whereas a History teacher these skills are key – Finding information, collecting it and being critical of the information in conducting a historical inquiry, forms the bedrock of research in History. The other aspects of using networks and publishing the created information is the missing element, and this is where I see further progression needs to take place within my own teaching context for my students.

Connected Learning would not be able to exist without Digital Literacy. Connected learning should be part of our daily lives as educators, we have the ability to connect with other educators online through Twitter, Blogs, and many other ways. However many of my students are still not utilising their connections to facilitate learning, and this is the area to focus on. This ties in well with what Helen Haste argues that in the future people will need to be able to adapt to change, to use new and old tools effectively, and to be confident that they can act in effective ways. These students are the future citizens, the future workers, the future inventors, the future leaders and they will need a set of skills that is different to what I grew up with.  Louise Starkey (2011) also supports these ideas about learning, “… appears to be slowly evolving from a focus on what has already been discovered and prescribed as ‘knowledge’ towards a focus on critical thinking skills, knowledge creation and learning through connections.”.  Through this the learning theory of ‘Connectivism’ is explained by George Siemens(2015) as being the “amplification of learning, knowledge and understanding through the extension of a personal network”. The Digital Media & Learning Research Hub is a fantastic resource place that explores, and showcase connected learning and what the key principles are. Quoted from their website: “….connected learning calls on today’s interactive and networked media in an effort to make these forms of learning more effective, better integrated, and broadly accessible.” Guiding principles include a ‘Shared purpose’, ‘Production-centered’ and ‘Openly networked’.
The connected learning environment, and how to interact with it professionally, socially and innovatively. My future goals will include improving my own understanding and knowledge of these areas, and also teaching my students how to become more digitally literate, more connected with learning and how to become more socially conscious citizens and leverage digital tools for their learning and the benefit of others.

References,. (2015). Connected Learning Principles | Connected Learning. Retrieved 29 March 2015, from
Siemens, G. (2015). elearnspace. Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Retrieved 26 March 2015, from
Starkey, L. (2011). Evaluating learning in the 21st century: a digital age learning matrix. Technology, Pedagogy And Education20(1), 19-39. doi:10.1080/1475939x.2011.554021
YouTube,. (2015). Technology and Youth: Five Competencies (part 3 of 4). Retrieved 19 March 2015, from

Sunday, 15 March 2015

Master Blog Post 1

Two weeks into my Education Masters with Charles Sturt University and I'm loving the challenge and ideas being shared.

Blog Task 1: Using your readings and interaction with the subject to date, develop a statement about your current knowledge and understanding of concepts and practices in a digital age within the context of your work or professional circumstances. What is the context of your learning? What are your personal aims in this subject? What challenges are your hoping to meet for yourself?

Here is my 1st Blog post: Connected Potential & Changing Mindsets

The new innovations of the past two decades have created a digitally connected community of learners. Yet, many educators are not embracing the potential they hold and are thus becoming more disconnected with their students and communities. This is part of my own personal aim in this course – to learn new ideas, skills, knowledge and understanding, so that I can support my students, staff and parents in embracing the Digital Age.  Students may be assigned the term ‘Digital Natives’, but many are far from being proficient or aware of their own learning and interactions in the digital world. The reading about Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants (Prensky 2001) reinforced some of my views on the topic of ‘digital natives’ vs ‘digital immigrants’ perspective. Even though my students are all born in the Digital Age (current Year 12’s born in 1998), many are unskilled in utilising technology as a an effective way to learn, create, connect and communicate.
The concept and practices of the Digital Age is the driving force behind enrolling into the CSU Masters course. The Digital Age is where I’m working, living, learning and interacting in, and thus it is essential as an educator that I’m acutely aware of my own understanding and knowledge of this area. My teaching context involves being the Head of Humanities for an independent Christian College in a regional town in Queensland. The region is one of the lowest socio-economic areas in the state, with some of the highest unemployment figures across all areas of society (a challenge in itself). My role involves teaching Senior Modern & Ancient History, as well as Business Management for Year 11 & 12. Since changing careers from Logistics to Education I have been amazed by the connected world for educators and I love engaging in discussions with educators from all sectors.
There is a digital convergence taking place with regards to media, literacy, communication and sharing of knowledge. The ubiquitous nature of technology is allowing for new practices to emerge and requires new methods of engaging learners to develop. However it does not come down to technological skills alone, but rather the mindset changing amongst educators and students. This is well supported in this image by Reid Wilson on ‘The Profile of a Modern Teacher’:
The Profile of a Modern Teacher by reid Wilson (CC BY-NC-ND)
Another reading I came across was on ‘What is 21st century learning? by Amy Heavin that was published on Fractus Learning:
“What is 21st century learning?
  • It is collaboration.
  • It is creativity.
  • It is critical thinking and problem-solving.
  • It is research and information literacy.
  • It is digital citizenship.
  • It is responsible use.”
Immersion into the developing these skills to connect and share knowledge will become key for educators and students. The ease of access to information and possibilities to share knowledge has resulted in a paradigm shift that needs to be embraced, fostered and utilised to realise its full potential.
The  Connected Learning Research Hub discussed in Module 1.6 really reinforced my beliefs, and challenged me to develop my own thinking further to serve my students.  The infographic I find incredibly powerful, and is a wonderful model of learning in the information age. This leads me into my own goals and challenges with making connections between the different groups, allowing digital tools to be utilised to their potential and developing my own knowledge and understanding through this course.
Connected Learning
Connected Learning Research Network and Digital Media & Learning Research Hub (CC BY 3.0)

Connected Learning Infographic | Connected Learning. (n.d.). Retrieved March 15, 2015, from
Educators Need to be 21st Century Learners Too… (2014, July 15). Retrieved March 15, 2015, from
Prensky, M. (2001, 12). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. doi: 10.1108/10748120110424816
Sheninger, E. C. (n.d.). Digital leadership: Changing paradigms for changing times.
Wayfaring Path. (n.d.). Retrieved March 15, 2015, from

Saturday, 28 February 2015

The end of the epic #28daysofwriting

The end of the epic #28daysofwriting about A to Z of my random education thoughts.

It has been fantastic being part of this writing expedition over the last 4 weeks. I have made my quota every day, and I have increased my blog posts total to over 70. It has been a wonderful learning process, and I have improved some aspects of my blogging over the past few weeks. There have been days when I struggled for inspiration and when I have been too tired to contemplate writing, and those posts tended to be my worst posts. Overall however I had many opportunities to reflect and share my thoughts, nd it has also allowed me to get more insight into my own thinking. New ideas and inspiration has been formed, and new questions have developed. Thank you to Tom Barrett for initiating this idea and my wife Jacqui du Toit for being my support.

As I end the #28daysofwriting I thought I would share my most memorable posts that I enjoyed writing and had most comments about. These will probably lead to further exploration in the coming months. I love learning and discovering new ideas, and being constantly challenges and growing.

T -Teaching River #28daysofwriting Day 21: (My 2nd Blog post to have over 300 hits!)
...Life does not happen in isolation, we all are influenced by others and in turn influence people. I know that my life as a teacher I will go through many phases, ups and downs, and that they are all part of my own learning journey.  This is how I see the link with a river, the continuous flow of developing my own skills, learning, gaining knowledge and wisdom, being a role model, a positive influence and mentor to my students...

I love 'Teaching', I'm proud to call myself a 'Teacher'; and the complexity of learning and constant change makes it the most fascinating profession in the world. 

We need to develop this Mindset in our student to not give up, not believe that they cannot change, that they cannot do something. This involves in us having the mindset of growth and risk-taking, and embracing challenges. 

Don't say "I can't", let's all start saying "Yet" (and "Yes") and change mindsets.

Leadership I have always been involved in some form of leadership, whether being the leader or being a member of the leadership team. I...

A is for..Assessment, Authentic & Australia So when I had the thought of doing the alphabet as part of my #28daysofwriting...

D - Digital Leadership One of the most important terms in education is to have schools providing 'Digital Leadership'...

You need to start somewhere, and I would encourage all educators to keep on trying new ideas, technology, keep on reading, start blogging, attend TeachMeets, join Twitter, connect with other educators. We all have so much to share and to learn from each other. You don't know what is out there until you begin.

Just Go Ahead and Jump..........

'Always Learning'

Twitter PLN
I also enjoyed being able to recommend so many great members of my PLN to the people that read my Blog posts. My apologies to anyone that I missed. There are many other wonderful educators in my Twitter PLN that I'm looking forward to connecting with more and more. There is so much to learn from one another and I encourage everyone to make connections and grow together.

Here is the list from the A-Z Blog posts:

Nicholas Provenzano
Nathan Weaver
Paul Browning
Pernille Ripp
Phillip Cooke
Phil Shapiro
Phil Taylor
Paul Gibbs
Peter Cameron